Series Project Part II

 

For the creation of this entire series project, I got my inspiration from Keltie Ferris and Charley Harper.  Both of these artists have high-saturated pallets and interesting compositions that deal with contrast and movement.

For this specific project I specifically chose the inspiration from Charley Harper.  He is a painter that created a lot of geometric bird and animal paintings. Harper was very fond of color and explained how he defined the Grand Canyon based off the different layers of color and how he liked both bold and subtle colors.  So, for part two of my project I decided to create these abstracted tropical birds of paradise by using high saturated colors for their feathers and a grey scale background to help make each bird pop.  I taped off each canvas into sections in order to continue my taping off process and connect all of the birds together.

I did each bird separately and really focused on the importance of portraying movement and dimension in these birds to bring them to life. In Harper’s work, I find that he is really able to capture the animals in such an amazing recognizable way by using only curved and straight lines, it is incredible. From his paintings, you really can get a feel of what the animals’ behavior is like. To help with this I used looser brushstrokes throughout the painting.  Just like in Harper’s work I wanted to give the birds a good sense of character.

 

 

First Bird

 

Second Bird

 

Third Bird

After the in-process critique, I decided to add the color coordinated highlights for the beaks and also to the eyes. I was planning on adding the white highlight to the eyes; however, I wasn’t originally going to change the highlights I had done on the beaks.  I was ok with the beak change in the purple and blue birds, but at first I didn’t know how to feel about the yellow bird, but this change also grew on me.

Overall the process was super fun, and it was great to see some of the sketches and doodles that I have created come to life.  I love how the piece, “Birds of Paradise”, turned out.